Our man [formally] of Amsterdam


Stoney-faced in Rapa Nui
February 26, 2010, 14:00
Filed under: Chile, Travel

Ever wanted to get away from it all, to really get away? Well, the one place on the planet that is furtherest from human habitation is Rapa Nui. Apart from its 4000 inhabitants and a steady stream of tourists, the nearest thing to a permanent civilisation is almost 2000 kilometres away to the west in Pitcairn Island, or roughly the same distance east to Chile.

Such isolation has its challenges. Lots of things have to be flown in (there is no port or ship loading facility), and this costs lots, as does maintaining basic infrastructure and providing essential services. Most roads are not paved, but are dusty rock-strewn tracks with potholes as big as tractor tyres. Packs of mostly friendly dogs either lie about in the molten humidity or bark wildly. Come to think of it, most of the humans on the island, including the tourists, did too.

Centuries of tribal warfare has left the island stripped bare of any forestation, leaving no trees for shade and a landscape more barren and infertile than most deserts. So everything has to be flown in, and this costs lots.

A common mode of local transport is on horseback, and piles of manure left on the streets of the island’s only settlement lend the air the scent of a stable. That’s why you need to take a torch with you at night because the street lights don’t always work, and you never know what you might tread on after dark.

Rapa Nui is a Chilean territory, so this means good ice-cream and tasty pisco sours are never far away. Neither are the stoney-faced statues (know as moai) that define the island’s international identity and provide its chief source of income. Most moai were desecrated  during prolonged internecine fighting hundreds of years ago. Apart from the free-standing monoliths at various stages of construction on the slopes of Rano Raraku (the volcanic quarry where the statues were carved), most other moai have been re-erected by locals, usually with the help of aid organisations or philanthropic initiatives, to not only preserve an integral cultural legacy, but attract tourists as well.

And it works. More than 50,000 of us turn up annually, and most of these during the ‘peak’ season from December to March, when the tradewinds abate slightly and the UV meter drops from Extreme to High. True, you can scuba dive or ride a wave or hike a hill or burn some skin while here, but you can do these elsewhere, probably cheaper and likely much better.

For us, Rapa Nui was a very convenient stopover, a neat midway rest stop on our long haul home across the Pacific from Santiago to Sydney via Tahiti. It’s a stopover, not a destination, which you could probably say about a lot of Asian or Middle Eastern cities (Bangkok and Hong Kong; Dubai and Abu Dhabi), but they are stopovers you could easily revisit, and Rapa Nui is definitely not.

Click here for Rapa Nui Flickr set …

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