Our man [formally] of Amsterdam


For reasons of security
January 23, 2010, 14:30
Filed under: Brazil, Travel

Peter Allen and Barry Manilow have a lot to answer for because Copacabana is crap. Ugly high rise hotels line a long curved beach, and the tepid warm water is not that clean, nor is the sand. Haven’t seen a wave all week; and they call this paradise. Heavily armed tourist police patrol the beach, ‘for reasons of security’.

The city however, is extraordinary. The sheer physicality of its topography, with its high-density living, its frantic noise, its mega energy, its kamikaze bus drivers, its smouldering heat, its tropical downpours, its blizzardly cold beers, its poseurs and pretenders constantly parading along promenades, all make it feel like you’re living in a permanent fast lane with no drop-off zone in sight.

In one of the many little kiosks along the beach, a barman took a green coconut and held it upright in the palm of his hand and with a very sharp, shiny machete he lashed down at the top of the coconut and sliced off a section, then he did it again but from a different angle, taking another wedge off the top to make an opening, and if the machete slipped down the side of the coconut, his hand would have been separated from his wrist, but this didn’t happen. After that, he added some ice cubes and a straw and charged 3 reais (about $2) for a coco drink. It was not very refreshing, and so I only ordered caipirinhas after that (mashed limes, sugar syrup and cane liquor, shaken over ice) because they are extremely refreshing in the heat, but more than four can make you a bit tiddly, which is why it’s wise to have some acaraje (spicy prawn croquettes) as well, ‘for reasons of sobriety’.

Everyone wears Havaianas, probably for reasons of national prosperity or identity.

In the favela slums, the drug barons and their armies keep the peace (and everything else) because the police don’t go there, unless a gang war breaks out, which is usually for control of territory. The last ‘war’ was in 2004 and it lasted 40 days. Only marijuana and cocaine is traded; there is no heroin at all. The drug boss of the largest slum (120,000 plus residents) has a nickname that translates from the Portuguese to ‘baby’ in English; this according to Simone, the guide of the excellent favela tour I took. Apparently ‘Baby’ moves house every week or so, ‘for reasons of security’.

Rio’s Maracana football stadium holds 100,000 plus and I went to see a game between two arch rival teams in the local state league that was played in scorching temperatures, and fans where kept apart by polizia with batons the size of baseball bats. (These were different police to the ones on the beach beat.) You had to lift up your shirt at the security check point on entering to ensure you weren’t carrying firearms or other weapons.  Most males (and many females) took their shirt off, and left it off anyway, which had horrendous consequences on the trip home (more later). Fans with drums and horns and trumpets and trombones made more noise than a symphony orchestra, and sounded much better. Thankfully, the section I ended up in was the victor on the day (3-0), and it was the largest contingent by far, so I felt safe because there is safety in numbers, but there is also very bad body odour when the same numbers pack into the metro to go home.

The jockey club races 4 days a week (entrance is free) with about 8-10 races each day, and I only lost about $50, but that’s OK. Spent maybe $100 on expenses though, mainly rehydrating refreshments because it was about 35 degrees well into the night and there was still 2 or 3 races to go, but I didn’t stay because I wasn’t sure when the last bus from the jockey club back to Copacabana was, and I may not have had enough money for a taxi. There was a tiny  crowd, which was 95% white , 99% male, plus 1 gringo who looked decidedly out of place wandering around and carrying a camera, but the numbers attending slowly went up as the temperatures came down. The concierge gave me 2 tips before I left; the first one ran last and the second one was to don’t even think about walking back to the hotel at night, ‘for reasons of security’. See a Racing in Rio Flickr set here.

The roads, the beaches, the sites, the thronging metropolis, all feel crowded and stretched to bursting point now; so how will it cope with a Football World Cup (2014) and the Olympic Games just 2 years later? The city authorities may have to call a truce and enlist the drug barons’ armies, ‘for reasons of security’ and efficiency. Welcome to Rio; mind the irony.

Click image to see Rio Flickr set

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1 Comment so far
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I’ve never been to Rio do Janeiro but I liked your discription, your writting makes it very interesting to read 🙂

Comment by thelocalguide




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